Sunday, July 19, 2015

Season 1 - The Hustlers: A Review

Take some hot chicks who also shoot a pretty decent game of pool, make a reality show about them and it would seem you have a recipe for a hit show, at least a cult classic, and a show that could give the grand old game of pocket billiards a much needed shot in the arm. But, then you add some representatives of the male gender, representatives whose behavior should not be condoned in any pool room and certainly should not be broadcast on television where it might influence the behavior of people just getting into the game. Loud mouths, bullshitters and whiners who make unsportsmanlike conduct, sharking and downright cheating an everyday part of their games - that's just what we need more of. Knowing the popularity of the show among local pool players, I know it's only a matter of time before these yahoos start mimicking Gary, Ross and Finn. Oy vey!

Is this really doing the game of pool any good? I don't think so.

The only participants who manage to escape Season 1 with their honor in tact are Jennifer Barretta, Mike Dechaine and, though up to now she's played only a minor role in the show, Yomaylin Sanchez.

Amusingly, the season finale ended with Emily Duddy proclaiming that maybe now the other players would start taking her seriously. Why, because she won a couple matches after being spotted 5 games on the wire, plus the five ball? Sorry, maybe not that seriously, yet.

Thursday, January 23, 2014

A Website for My Pool League

I thought it was a good idea – to provide pool league operators web pages where they could provide players with online access to schedules, standings, stats, rules and other pertinent data – but I haven’t had a single taker in all the time I’ve been offering this service to pool leagues. Not that I haven’t tried to promote the idea – I have. But, if there are pool league operators out there who would be receptive to the idea, I haven’t been able to reach them. Still, I haven’t given up on the idea. I’m going to keep plugging until somebody signs on. I think it would be a good deal for me and for them.


For more details, go to Ace’s Pool League HQ.

Friday, August 23, 2013

Charley Kutz - A New Guy in Town Replacing Cue Tips

For years, whenever anyone asked me who I'd recommend to replace their cue tip, I'd suggest they travel north to Capone's in Spring Hill and ask for Roger. But, now, for those who live in Pasco County and think Capone's is too far away, there's a new guy in town and his name is Charley Kutz. Charley's been working on cues for years for himself and friends, but he's only just now making his skills available to the public. Charley's a friend of mine and I'd trust him with my most precious stick. You should, too.


CK-CUE SERVICE (New Port Richey, FL) - Replace Cue Tips; Clean and Seal Shafts; Remove Dings; Straighten Warped Shafts. Call Charley Kutz between 12PM and 6PM
727-534-4192

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

John Bender Cues: Having a Little Fun with Boxes

Checking in with my friend, John Bender of johnbendercues.com, he sent along some pics of his latest creations. You won't be too surprised by the beauty and quality of John's work when you remember that prior to striking out on his own he had worked with Hall of Fame cuemaker Richard Black.

 In regards to his current work he says "Just having a little fun with boxes that go around corners. Black buffalo horn joint and cap. .015 nickel silver rings at the handle, cap, and joint." I like those boxes a lot.







Sunday, June 30, 2013

Sneaky Pete Cues: A Matter of Taste


Though I had shot a little pool at the YMCA, where the walls were too close to the table on all four sides, and at a social club for kids that met afterschool downstairs at the First Memorial Presbyterian Church in Dover, New Jersey, I didn't really get into the game until I started going to Teasdale's Billiard Academy.

Typically, upon arrival, I'd search through the cue racks until I found my favorite cue. Since I wasn't an accomplished player - I was only 12 when I started going to the poolroom on a regular basis - I'm guessing my primary criteria were straightness and feel. Yes, I was one of those morons who rolled his cue on the table to see if it was straight, not realizing that any irregularity on the butt end would cause the cue to wobble, even if it was straight. And, I've always liked a smooth slick feel.

Since I was outside, waiting, every day when Teasdale arrived, he asked if I might want the job of helping him remove the covers from the tables on a daily basis. It wasn't a paying job, but he did offer to give me a half-hour free practice time in exchange for my assistance and that seemed like a pretty good deal to me.

It wasn't too long after that that he presented me with my own cue, an 18 ounce house cue that he had sanded down and given a new tip. It wasn't mine to keep, but it was mine to use whenever I wanted. He had written "Ace" on the butt and kept it on a special rack behind the counter.

Soon after that, he began selling "Willie Mosconi On Pocket Billiards." Following his suggestion, I bought a copy. I almost immediately began improving at an amazing rate. That book became my bible. By the time I was 15 I was running 50 balls in straight pool as easy as rolling off a log and making a pretty good allowance spotting older guys who were already out in the working world 15 or 20 balls in games to fifty points.

And through all that time I had that trusty house cue that Tizzy had customized for me. That's the feel I grew up with and most likely that's why I prefer that same feel today. In my Sunday-Goin'-To-Meetin' 3x6 Instroke cue case, I carry three cues. My regular playing cue is a Josey purple heart sneaky pete. I've used it a few years, now, and it has become as much a part of me as my first cue did 50 odd years ago.

I also carry a 90's vintage Meucci cue which has a wrap but since it's all varnished over it has a nice smooth feel. I remember an old friend of mine, Tennessee Joe, had a collection of Meucci cues. Whenever he played with one you would see him regularly applying powder to the shaft and the butt, just to maintain that smooth slick feel.

The third cue in my case, my break-jump cue, also is without a wrap. That's how I roll.

Now, I've been known to play in bars from time to time in leagues and in tournaments. I would never... NEVER bring my prime equipment into a bar. Not only because it's kind of dorky to beat up on bar players using a custom made stick, but because with all the metal on the tables and drunks wandering back and forth it's too easy to damage your equipment.

My favorite bar cue is a Falcon Sneaky-Pete I picked up back in 2006. It still looks and plays well. Before that I was using an Elite EP01 stick. It had a wood to wood joing and played pretty well but a piece of the cherrywood at the butt end broke off and, even though I reglued it with super glue, that bothered me and I wound up selling it to a guy one night for $20.

For several years I was content to use a basic $50 Players stick, but years of sanding reduced the shaft to the dimensions of a snooker cue and I started havin trouble controling old whitey, drawing it much farther than I intended.

For those thinking about buying a Sneaky Pete Cue, here are my thoughts. If you want a better stick, most of the custom cue-makers offer sneaky-petes. Go to their sites. Ask them. Like I said, I'm happy with my Josey and wouldn't trade it for anything.

As far as manufactured cues go, Predator, Meucci, Mezz and Joss each offer sneakies that look and play extremely well.




Action ACT39 - Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

Action ACT39 - Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Action ACT41 - Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

Action ACT41 - Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Action ERA01 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

Action ERA01 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Action ERA03 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

Action ERA03 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Action ERA02 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

Action ERA02 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Action ERA05 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

Action ERA05 - Rosewood Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



I sell quite a few sneakies on my website. Most popular with players who shop there are the Action ACT39 Sneaky Pete Cue, the Action ERA01 Rosewood Sneaky Pete, and the 5280 MHSP Birdseye Sneaky Pete.


5280 MHSP - Birdseye Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

5280 MHSP - Birdseye Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Mezz ZZSP Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

Mezz ZZSP Sneaky Pete Pool Cue Stick

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Joss JOSSP Sneaky Pete Cue

Joss JOSSP Sneaky Pete Cue

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Meucci 9701 Sneaky Pete Cue

Meucci 9701 Sneaky Pete Cue

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Predator Roadline SP6GN Sneaky Pete Cue

Predator Roadline SP6GN Sneaky Pete Cue

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Predator Roadline SP6ON Sneaky Pete Cue

Predator Roadline SP6ON Sneaky Pete Cue

For details about this cue, the current up-to-the-minute price, and magnified views, click the button.



Admittedly, pool cues are a personal thing. Some prefer sticks that look like they belong in a woodworkers museum. Others, like me, just want one that feels right and does the job. If you've never owned a cue before, buy a cheap one in the $50 to $100 dollar range and see how you like it. Maybe it'll be all you need.